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Good Minutes Holy Week & Easter

Good Minutes Holy Week & Easter

In case you missed them, here are the Good Minutes for Holy Week and Easter!

Good Minutes is a time to gather the family, watch, learn, and wonder together. Krista shares about beginnings, endings, and middles reflecting on Holy Week. New Year’s, the school year…so many moments in life have a beginning and ending, and it’s what happens in the middle that shapes those endings.

Easter is celebration and light! Jesus is the Light of the world and the darkness cannot overcome it! Krista engages viewers to find the light and how light always prevails over darkness.

Week 3: Love. What do we expect?

Love. What do we expect? -Written by Krista Monson

Let’s face it. We love to be loved. We need to be loved. Many times we want to be loved in specific ways. Our hearts may be just a bit happier if we got a hug, or if someone we love sent us a nice text or phone call. Maybe a bad day would be brighter if we spent some time with a friend or someone close to us. When we do not experience love in a way we want or expect, we tend to feel more lonely, isolated, and even disappointed in the people close to us.

We all show love in different ways. There are different love languages. Five to be exact, according to Gary Chapman’s work. Five ways to show/speak love: Words of Affirmation, Physical Touch, Gifts, Acts of Service, and Quality Time. The 5 Love Languages highlight that there are specific ways people tend to give and receive love. Think of a bad day; perhaps one that you have had recently. What did you need to get better? How could someone have helped you feel better? What does that show about how you like to receive love? Now, reverse it. How do you like to show others love when they are experiencing a hard time?

A fun way to consider the 5 Love Languages!

A fun way to consider the 5 Love Languages!

1 Corinthians 13 shares that “Love is patient, love is kind. It does not envy, it does not boast, it is not proud. It does not dishonor others, it is not self-seeking, it is not easily angered, it keeps no record of wrongs. Love does not delight in evil but rejoices with the truth. It always protects, always trusts, always hopes, always perseveres.” We can get caught up in how we expect to be loved and miss seeing love around us. We also can feel burdened by the expectation we feel to show love and not experience love in return. Or some of us even neglect to let others help or show us love! 1 Corinthians is an invitation to release our expectations on love. To allow the unexpected and communicate to one another through love and compassion.

Time to Chat.

Which do you think is your top love language? What ways do you like to receive love? For example, I like hugs. Which way do you tend to give love? I am a helper, so I tend to give acts of service. Is it the same language of giving and receiving for you? Want to learn more about the 5 Love Languages and take a quiz to learn yours? Kids, teens, couples, and singles can all take a quiz here.

Challenge.

Take what you have learned about love languages and apply it through a random act of kindness this week! That’s unexpected! We need to learn and challenge ourselves to continually show love to others. A great way by doing this is random acts of kindness. Try using words of affirmation and leaving a kind note for someone in your family or a stranger. A post-it note or small note of encouragement can go a long way! Acts of service can be helping a neighbor clear their sidewalk of ice or picking up litter. There are multiple ways to show love! Choose one language and try to “beef up” your skills and show love all week.

Week 1: Love in Lent

Love is a verb.

There are three types of love: philos, eros, agape.

As families, we are familiar with philos, family love, brotherly love, friendship. Philos is that shared admiration for those who accompany us through life. Those with which we spend time.

Eros is romantic love. It is rooted in the strong way we feel around those to whom we are attracted.

Agape is unconditional love. This love is not based on merit of the person loved, but rather unconditional and based on them as an image bearer of Christ. This love is kind and generous. It continues to give even when the other is unkind, unresponsive and unworthy. It only desires good things for the other and is compassionate. [Huffington Post]

Love, especially agape love, is going to be our focus throughout Lent. Every week we will have a new blog post sharing about another way to consider love in this Lenten journey. So bring the family together and get ready to share stories, activities, and conversation about how we express, experience, grow, and learn in love.

Time to Chat

Where do you experience love? Who shows you love? How do they do that?


Photo Challenge

Where are you experiencing love? How does it show up in your day? Love is shown in many ways. It was seen in random acts of kindness this past week with people coming together to clear snow! Perhaps you have experienced it in someone sharing a kind word, or a memento of a loved one reminding you of a love you can experience over and over.

We want to know your stories! Capture love via photo and post it with the hashtag #gloriadeilove to your social media throughout these next weeks of Lent. Let us be mindful to look for love within us and around us every day.

Left: Love is an encouraging note from my sister in the mail! #gloriadeilove

Right: Love is being reunited with my German host brother, Lukas, after four years apart. #gloriadeilove

All the Feels- by Krista

All the Feels

by Krista Monson

My mother said something to me when I was young that has stuck with me for decades. “Emotions are valid. It’s your attitude that is your choice.”

She constantly reminded me, and still reminds me today, that there is nothing wrong with feeling angry, frustrated, sad, upset, jealous, or disappointed. Those are emotions. Feelings. Every single one is completely natural. The choice we have is what we do with those emotions; especially when interacting with others. As a child, when I chose harsh words and actions towards my siblings to reflect my feelings, I was rewarded with a time out. Time to reconsider my attitude and actions. Time to take a break, breathe, and make a new choice.

Everyone should be quick to listen, slow to speak and slow to become angry…” James 1:19b

Decades later, I still practice choosing my attitude amidst days of emotions. A common phrase a friend and I use is “All the Feels” to express how overwhelmed we can be by the sheer number of emotions we experience in a day. It can be tiring. It can leave us not knowing how to proceed. I take comfort in the reminder that emotions are valid and I can take a time out to breathe, pray for patience and guidance, and consider my attitude and how I interact with the world.